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Best Brand of Hiking Boots

#1 User is offline   Headhardhat 

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 07:31 PM

I was asked by a friend of mine what is the best brand of hiking boots out there. He just so happens to be a very well travelled missionary down in Equador and spends his time geocaching in jungles, volcanoes and other extreme terrains.

He mentioned that his boots usually only lasts about six months - go figure.

So I figured the best people to ask are other geocachers... Any suggestions?

I personally would like to know how many of us use snake boots as hiking boots and what is the best brand for those as well.

As always your input is greatly appreciated.

-HHH

#2 User is offline   iPhone3Gcacher 

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 07:39 PM

I just got a pair of KEENs for X-mas. So far so good. before that i used Asolos.

#3 User is offline   flask 

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 08:00 PM

asolo for me.

the best boot is what fits your foot, though.

#4 User is offline   Keystone 

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 08:32 PM

I am moving this thread from the Geocaching Topics forum to the Hiking and Backpacking forum. You will get more and better responses there, and your topic will stay nearer to the top of the page for longer.

#5 User is offline   jwlush 

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 08:57 PM

Hands down, ECCO brand.

http://www.eccousa.com/shoes/mens/outdoor/...740/detail.aspx

This post has been edited by jwlush: 02 January 2009 - 08:59 PM


#6 User is offline   briansnat 

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 03:11 AM

It's hard to recommend a "best" brand of hiking boot because the best hiking boot is the one that fits your feet. Different brands fit different kinds of feet, so a brand that I love could be living hell on your feet.

I learned this lesson long ago when I paid nearly $300 for a pair of hiking boots that came very highly recommended by numerous people. They sit unused (for the past 18 years) in my closet, with only half dozen trips on them. They are great boots I'm sure, for someone else.

There are many quality hiking boot manufacturers. Among them are Asolo, Merrell, Salomon, Rachlie, Vasque, Lowa, Scarpa, LL Bean, Danner, Alcio, Montrail, Technica, Zamberlan and Garmot. If your friend chooses from among these brands he's likely to get a quality hiking boot.

All hiking boots wear out. Mine last about a year to a year and a half before they need to be replaced, but I hike hundreds of miles each year. There is a fine balance between weight and durability. A heavier boot will likely be more durable than a lightweight boot, but unless you are mountaineering a heavy boot will be unnecessary weight on your feet.

If durability is a concern, tell your friend to look for boots with Norwegian Welt construction. These are the boots with stitching around the soles, rather than the glued on soles that are so popular today. Norwegian Welt boots are generally heavier than glued boots, but provide better stability and are much more durable. Another advantage of Norwegian Welt construction is that the soles can be replaced by a shoe maker when they wear out. Many of the manufacturers I mentioned above sell a few models with Norwegian Welt construction,

#7 User is offline   dakboy 

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 05:04 AM

The best thing to do is to go to a good outdoor/backpacking store like EMS, REI, or a smaller local store and find out what fits. THEN look at reliability/durability reviews and the like.

A highly-regarded boot is worthless if it doesn't fit right. The right fit is the absolute most important factor in ANY boot purchase.

#8 User is offline   DustyWalker 

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 04:42 PM

My favorites are Hanwags

#9 User is offline   qlenfg 

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 09:50 AM

I've got small, wide feet, so my boot selection is rather limited. I usually stick with New Balance shoes, so I thought I would try their Dunham boots, since they accommodate wide feet. The first pair of boots were 6" waterproof leather Thinsulate, and they wore very well.

I usually wear out the boot itself before I wear out the sole, either with cuts or by stretching the lowers out enough that the laces won't tighten them up any more. After a year, the first pair were pretty stretched out and had a few deep cuts. Time to get some more.

Unfortunately, Dunham dropped their leather boot line in favor of man-made materials. I have nothing against the material itself, but the boots have a tennis shoe type sole, which is not what I want in a boot. Since I couldn't find much else that would fit me, I thought I would try a pair.

The boot itself is very comfortable and fits like a glove, However, the ankle 'padding' around the top of the boot starts bruising my ankles and getting very uncomfortable after an hour or so. At first I thought I just needed to get them broken in, but it never got any better.

If I don't lace the boot up too far, or leave it laced loosely, I can wear them at bit longer, but not much. I'm beyond the return period, but I'm thinking of sending them back with a letter explaining the issue to see what they will do for me.

#10 User is offline   Criminal 

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 10:58 AM

View PostHeadhardhat, on Jan 2 2009, 07:31 PM, said:

I was asked by a friend of mine what is the best brand of hiking boots out there.

You asked for the “best brand” and seem to be getting people’s favorite brand for answers.

EDIT

I’ve hiked comfortably in Keen sandals and Vasque boots.

View Postbriansnat, on Jan 3 2009, 03:11 AM, said:

It's hard to recommend a "best" brand of hiking boot because the best hiking boot is the one that fits your feet. Different brands fit different kinds of feet, so a brand that I love could be living hell on your feet.


There’s your answer.

This post has been edited by Criminal: 04 January 2009 - 11:11 AM


#11 User is offline   JohnnyVegas 

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 12:23 AM

View PostHeadhardhat, on Jan 2 2009, 07:31 PM, said:

I was asked by a friend of mine what is the best brand of hiking boots out there. He just so happens to be a very well travelled missionary down in Equador and spends his time geocaching in jungles, volcanoes and other extreme terrains.

He mentioned that his boots usually only lasts about six months - go figure.

So I figured the best people to ask are other geocachers... Any suggestions?

I personally would like to know how many of us use snake boots as hiking boots and what is the best brand for those as well.

As always your input is greatly appreciated.

-HHH

There is no such thing as the best brand in a hiking boot. There are many high quality boots on the market by several companies. The best boot is the one that fits the persons boot the best.
Myself I find that Vasque boots fit my feet the best. The key to buying a boot os the be willing to spend time trying boots int the style you are interested from several companies. If is also a good idea to buy hiking boots from a store deals primarily in back packing. Depending on your location REI would be a good place to start.

try this link

buying hiking boots

This post has been edited by JohnnyVegas: 05 January 2009 - 12:29 AM


#12 User is offline   JohnnyVegas 

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 12:25 AM

View Postjwlush, on Jan 2 2009, 08:57 PM, said:


I would not call ECCO a true hiking boot, the ECCO boots that I have seen offer not torsional support. They may look like a hiking boot, but they just do not offer much support.

#13 User is offline   Kit Fox 

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 08:59 AM

I've been in pursuit of the perfect boot for many years. Trying to find a boot that is tall enough to prevent dirt / stickers from filling my socks, and that fits well around my heal (no movement) has been hard. Most tall boots i've tried are sloppy in the heal area. The best fitting, most comfortable boot I have ever worn is my Merrells. I spent an extra $30 for a set of Superfeet green insoles.

My only gripe relates to the Merrells being a mid-sized boot. To deal with short boots, I bought a set of Gaitors. Now my feet are comfortable, my boots work great, and no crap goes in my shoes. :lol:

Invidual results may vary. :)

#14 User is offline   markandsandy 

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 11:17 AM

View Postdakboy, on Jan 3 2009, 05:04 AM, said:

The best thing to do is to go to a good outdoor/backpacking store like EMS, REI, or a smaller local store and find out what fits. THEN look at reliability/durability reviews and the like.

A highly-regarded boot is worthless if it doesn't fit right. The right fit is the absolute most important factor in ANY boot purchase.

Yep, FIT is the most important factor.

Right now I'm wearing a pair of inexpensive Coleman (yes, the camping gear people) hiking boots. Got them on sale a couple years ago. Reasonably well constructed and THEY FIT.

Saturday we went to REI to get my wife a new pair of boots, and she tried on at least five pairs until she found the ones that FIT. We didn't limit the selection based upon brand names.

Saw someone hiking in mud and snow last week in flip-flops. Now that's crazy! :lol:

#15 User is offline   vw_keychain 

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 02:46 AM

Maintenance is also an important factor in the longevity of walking boots, you can spend alot of money on boots but if you leave them damp and covered in mud in your garage after every use and don't clean/polish/reproof them then they can soon disintegrate.

Go to a store that knows how to fit walking boots properly. They should look at your feet without socks on to assess the shape of your feet and wether you have any problems such as bunions or pronate/supinate excessively, measure your feet, recommend boots suitable for your shape of foot and test the fit of boots you try on an inclined slope. They should also be able to recommend suitable socks and insoles for you and show you good techniques for lacing your boots, this can affect the fit and prevent excessive movement inside the boot.

#16 User is offline   Arse&Hemi 

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 09:47 AM

Without a doubt our favorite boots for hiking and backpacking are Scapa SL M3’s. We have tried just about every other brand out there and we think these are the finest hiking boots made!Posted Image

This post has been edited by Arse&Hemi: 10 January 2009 - 10:46 AM


#17 User is offline   Cal W. 

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 10:22 AM

I wear Timberland Cadion XCR's. They have Gore-Tex XCR, which makes them extremely waterproof, and then they are made of a Kevlar-type material, making them near-indestructable. They are meant for backpacking, and they are extremely comfortable. The only disadvantage is that they aren't that tall, which allows snow to get in them if it is too deep, and with living in Erie, PA that becomes an issue, lol. But if you live in an area without snow, these are amazing boots.

#18 User is offline   Jeepergeo 

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 08:39 PM

The question at hand is almost like asking for help defining "Great Art"! It is tough to do and there is probably never a perfect answer.

Many have searched for the perfect boot, and keep on searching. One wonders if we'll even recognize that the perfect boots may just be the pair currently on our feet!

That said, it's generally easy to recognize boots that are not perfect - they are usually highlighted by blisters, bleeding toes, and stone bruises.

My feeling is that unless you do the same thing day in and day out, there will never be a perfect pair of boots - it might take several pairs to cover the range of the fun stuff in which one takes part.

This post has been edited by Jeepergeo: 16 January 2009 - 08:41 PM


#19 User is offline   NewMexicoOutdoor 

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 05:17 PM

I bought a pair of Vasque High Tops...on sale for $99 ...6 years ago...and they're just wonderful and improving all the time! I have dirt from all over the world on um..and joke with other backpackers comparing dirt! :angry:~dfk

#20 User is offline   kmoore71 

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 05:24 PM

I personally LIKE my Asolos. But, like said in earlier posts, try some on and buy the ones that FIT THE BEST. You won't regret it. :angry:)

#21 User is offline   Jedi Cacher 

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 08:46 PM

View Postbriansnat, on Jan 3 2009, 04:11 AM, said:

It's hard to recommend a "best" brand of hiking boot because the best hiking boot is the one that fits your feet. Different brands fit different kinds of feet, so a brand that I love could be living hell on your feet.

I learned this lesson long ago when I paid nearly $300 for a pair of hiking boots that came very highly recommended by numerous people. They sit unused (for the past 18 years) in my closet, with only half dozen trips on them. They are great boots I'm sure, for someone else.

There are many quality hiking boot manufacturers. Among them are Asolo, Merrell, Salomon, Rachlie, Vasque, Lowa, Scarpa, LL Bean, Danner, Alcio, Montrail, Technica, Zamberlan and Garmot. If your friend chooses from among these brands he's likely to get a quality hiking boot.

I definitely agree with Briansnat on this one. There are so many companies that make good quality boots nowadays, but all feet are different and you must have them properly fitted. Go to a local store and try several pairs on. I would recommend doing this instead of mailorder. I prefer Vasque and Merrell, but that's just my opinion and my feet. I wish there was a store in my area that sold Garmot, as I'd really like to try a pair on.

There are several things to consider before buying your boots, like do you want them for dayhiking or backpacking, or do you want Goretex. I would definitely recommend goretex in whatever brand you choose. Also I would recommend a good pair of socks like Smartwools. I wear the Smartwool medium weight hiking socks. They are spendy but worth every penny.

You also mentioned snakeproof boots. I don't know too much about these, but I do have a friend that wears snakeproof gaiters when we go out on hiking excursions. I have only had 2 rattlesnake encounters in all my years of hiking, but you never know.

#22 User is offline   markandlynn 

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 08:15 AM

We both love our Miendl boots one piece leather upper construction, MFS foam inside but if they did not fit when trying them on we would not of bought them

It's probably more important to find a shop thatr knows how to find and test them when trying on.

If the shop does not have a ramp or similar testing environment find another shop.

#23 User is offline   fox-and-the-hound 

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 08:50 AM

Briansnat's advice is sound and pretty much sums it up for the rather broad question you're asking. We might be able to give you more definitive answers though if we knew more specifics about you. Male? Female? What's the typical terrain? Are you going up steep inclines or long walks on relatively flat land? Lot of water crossing or very little? All year or just fair weather? Strong ankles or weak ankles? I have boots from at least 4 of the previously mentioned brands and each is for a different kind of terrain and use. Something that is universal though is how a boot works. Spend a little time learning how the shank, upper, sole, lacings, tongue, scree collar etc. works and you'll have a much better understanding of what you're looking for specific to your use. Here's a link to an excellent resource to familiarize yourself with the anatomical structure of a boot...

http://www.abc-of-hiking.com/hiking-boots/...ot-features.asp

#24 User is offline   fox-and-the-hound 

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 08:52 AM

*hiccup*

This post has been edited by fox-and-the-hound: 19 January 2009 - 08:52 AM


#25 User is offline   Holtie22 

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 01:09 PM

I LOVE my Limmers

#26 User is offline   geospyder 

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 03:08 PM

Another vote for Vasque. I have two pair. One high top and one low top.

#27 User is offline   Gidenstam 

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 04:07 PM

I love my Lundhags Ranger High. high quality swedish made boots
www.lundhags.se

#28 User is offline   Chuy! 

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 01:03 PM

I appear to be in a minority for recommending Hi-Teks. I have Danners but I don't find them any more comfortable than Hi-Teks which run half the price. I wear a lite model for the summers and a waterproof model for the winters. The Altitude IV is the last pair I bought. Very comfortable and low-cost for my feets.

#29 User is offline   belair56 

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 03:10 PM

I use Vasque, and Merrill's, avoid Nevodas which just look like hiking boots and don't last.

#30 User is offline   2Trailblazers 

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 07:41 AM

The best brand of hiking shoe is the one that fits your feet and the type of hiking you prefer. I tried on many brands and love my Vasques- they fit like a glove, and no sore feet. My dh swears by his Merrills. If your friend is in Equador, he will need to consider waterproof boots.

#31 User is offline   Bedrok 

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 01:12 PM

I can only address the subject if your feet are narrow in the heel and wide in the forefoot like mine (I guess they call that shape of foot a "comination last"). If thats the case, I've wore out several dozen pairs in my 50 odd years and have a few suggestions: In a heavy duty backpacker- Scarpa ZG35, since replaced by their "Nepal". It has a snug heel, roomy toe box, full rubber rand and the best cold weather traction I know of. Or the Lowa Tibet. In a lightwieght winter boot-Keen Snoqualmie. Its hands down the most comfortable cold weather boot I've found. In a light to medium wieght hiker- Keen Oregon or Targee- my favorite is the Oregon, it has more support. As others have stated, If your feet are a different shape, you might not like the fit of those boots at all.

#32 User is offline   jackrock 

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 05:34 PM

View Post2Trailblazers, on Jan 24 2009, 07:41 AM, said:

The best brand of hiking shoe is the one that fits your feet and the type of hiking you prefer. I tried on many brands and love my Vasques- they fit like a glove, and no sore feet. My dh swears by his Merrills. If your friend is in Equador, he will need to consider waterproof boots.


I mostly agree with this and many other posts. I've tried other good brands but always go back to my first love - Vasque. I tried some Merrills and they had really poor traction on a wet surface (so much so that I took them off and wore my Tevas because we were walking a lot and wet rock). I've tried others that wore out fast and were hard to break in I've been happy with Vasque and they hold up well until I finally manage to wear them out. Still what's best for you depends on your feet.

#33 User is offline   Von-Horst 

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 04:52 AM

I cherish my Lowa Mountain Boots - they're comfy, warm, dry, have an excelent grippy sole and have a special heel 'thingie' that prevents them rubbing on my achilles (I suffer from tendonitis).

Best.


Boots.


Ever!

#34 User is offline   twhrider 

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 06:21 PM

Are any of these boot recommendations made in the USA?

#35 User is offline   fox-and-the-hound 

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 06:17 AM

View Postjackrock, on Feb 9 2009, 06:34 PM, said:

View Post2Trailblazers, on Jan 24 2009, 07:41 AM, said:

The best brand of hiking shoe is the one that fits your feet and the type of hiking you prefer. I tried on many brands and love my Vasques- they fit like a glove, and no sore feet. My dh swears by his Merrills. If your friend is in Equador, he will need to consider waterproof boots.


I mostly agree with this and many other posts. I've tried other good brands but always go back to my first love - Vasque. I tried some Merrills and they had really poor traction on a wet surface (so much so that I took them off and wore my Tevas because we were walking a lot and wet rock). I've tried others that wore out fast and were hard to break in I've been happy with Vasque and they hold up well until I finally manage to wear them out. Still what's best for you depends on your feet.


This raises another interesting point that we haven't really covered yet. Boots made for different seasons have different rubber composites for their soles and different tread types as well. Wearing winter-specific hiking boots in the summer will leave you with worn out treads in short order (very soft composites for better ice traction) while wearing summer-specific hiking boots in the winter could be treacherously slippery because of how much harder hot weather rubber composites are. The right gear makes all the difference. I have Merrells and Salomon specificly for summer and water in particular that are great on slick surfaces. I have Lowa and another set of Merrells for winter only. Try shopping out of season for the best deals on boots, too. :)

#36 User is offline   searchjaunt 

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 06:29 AM

I use Meindl and very happy about them

#37 User is offline   mattalbr 

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 08:31 AM

I've worn Vasque hiking and backpacking boots for about 15 years now. Considering longevity, construction quality, fit and features they're the best boots FOR ME. I recommend that you give them a look. Not the cheapest (by a longshot) but they last a long time so you get your money out of them.

#38 User is offline   ThirstyMick 

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 07:46 AM

View Postmattalbr, on Feb 19 2009, 08:31 AM, said:

I've worn Vasque hiking and backpacking boots for about 15 years now. Considering longevity, construction quality, fit and features they're the best boots FOR ME. I recommend that you give them a look. Not the cheapest (by a longshot) but they last a long time so you get your money out of them.

:) Is 7 months a long time? I think I abuse my shoes (or my feet are shaped unusually) because I'm about to throw out a pair of Vasques that I picked up in August (on a trip, after completely destroying the old ones...also about 6-7 months old) once I find a suitable replacement.

They were fantastic shoes, but didn't last any longer than the cheap ones from some no-name brand that I had previously. Being particular about my shoes, I had tried on just about every shoe in the store before finding this one, so the suggestion to find the right shoe for your feet is definitely a good one. Everybody will like something different. Personally, I like a light shoe with a flexible sole, which is probably a contributing factor in the longevity of my shoes.

#39 User is offline   Water-Rats 

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 07:54 AM

The best brand is the ones that feel the best on your feet.
Currently, and for the last 4 years I have been wearing some rather nice pale blue boots who's brand name has long since worn off the inside of the cuff. They are comfy, hard wearing and easy to clean. They were also £40 from an outdoor shop that we had to find ASAP when my Merrells gave up the ghost and split.

I figure that they will certainly do another summer of hiking.

#40 User is offline   Lou_U 

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 11:49 PM

This is a question that all of us have at some point in our hiking/backpacking lives. It is usually triggered by an experience on the trail with "Bad" Boots.

Unfortunately the answer can not be found in this forum or anywhere else on the internet. The answer can only be found at your outfitter and that’s only if they have employees knowledgeable about fitting boots.

I think I have a pretty good boot but I am not going to tell you what I have because the odds are against my boots being the best for you. Only after finding a good outfitter and stacking boxes of boots around you and trying each one on and walking around the store and on the stores incline apparatus can you narrow it down to a pair or two that fit your particular feet.

Once a boot is selected the salesperson can then start to customize the boot to fit you. My outfitter is a certified Phil Oren Boot fit specialist:
http://www.fitsystem...com/index2.html
If you go to this site you will find a wealth of information covering all aspects of boot selection and customization. You can also find a certified dealer in your area from this site.

The boots I selected had some potential hot spots. The salesperson that sold me my boots had to make several adjustments such as softening the affected areas with a rubbing bar, special lacing techniques, and added an option called a "tongue depressor" on one foot. That's right both feet are different and the left and right boot has to be customized specifically for its foot.

Also to get the right boot I recommend not looking at the price tag until check out unless you have picked more than one boot that would be a candidate for customization.

Good luck with the boot selection!
.

#41 User is offline   Lou_U 

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 12:00 AM

View Posttwhrider, on Feb 18 2009, 06:21 PM, said:

Are any of these boot recommendations made in the USA?


Danner makes three USA Made Hiking Boots: Danner Light II, Danner Explorer, and Danner Mountain Light II. Unfortunately for me I couldn't get the fight fit with them. I have a brother that has a pair and loves them. It depends on your feet.

Made in USA Danner Boots is a good starting point when looking for boots.

I hope they work out for you.

#42 User is offline   rovers3 

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 05:00 AM

I used to use Merrill's, they fit well but I found that the waterproofing was not adequate and they wore out quickly. Switched to Keen Oregon and another pair of Keen's. Need 1/2 size larger and they fit like a glove. I hiked approx 10 miles the first day with no problems.

Like others have said they have to fit your foot well, I'd buy them from a store that will let you wear them around the house for a week and then return them if they're not right. I got what is considered a good pair that fit well in the store ($200+) but the second day wearing them around the house, they felt awful so I returned them.

#43 User is offline   Lou_U 

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 06:46 AM

How Ironic, at the top of the page there was an advertisment for two different On-line Boot Stores.

Rule #1: Do not buy hiking boots on line!

#44 User is offline   fox-and-the-hound 

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 08:54 AM

View PostLou_U, on Mar 26 2009, 07:46 AM, said:

How Ironic, at the top of the page there was an advertisment for two different On-line Boot Stores.

Rule #1: Do not buy hiking boots on line!


There's nothing wrong at all with buying hiking boots online. You have to know what you're shopping for first though and that's why you should try a number of brands and styles in person. Learn which companies make shoes and styles that fit your foot well and meet the demands of your use. Once you know these things, you can shop online with confidence and keep in mind most companies allow you to return footwear that doesn't fit you well at little or no cost.

I know my foot shape and size (both of them - your feet are usually NOT identical) and have bought at least 6 different brands online in the last 5 years with no returns necessary. :)

#45 User is offline   Lou_U 

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 03:57 PM

View Postfox-and-the-hound, on Mar 26 2009, 08:54 AM, said:


I know my foot shape and size (both of them - your feet are usually NOT identical) and have bought at least 6 different brands online in the last 5 years with no returns necessary. :)


This is absolutely correct usually your two feet are different as they are for me as well. If you buy a pair of boots that fits one foot absolutely perfectly that leaves one that needs custom fitted and that's where a good outfitter comes in.

With the service and end product I received I don't mind that I paid full retail price which is nearly twice the lowest online price.

My current backpacking boot has never created a hot spot no matter how far I have traveled, how heavily my pack was loaded, or the hill profile of the trail. I know if I bought the exact same boots on line without customization I would probably have hotspots and blisters.

I am not against making purchases on line but for things that need to be fitted it's straight to the outfitter for me.

#46 User is offline   Klatch 

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 04:16 PM

View Postsearchjaunt, on Feb 19 2009, 10:29 AM, said:

I use Meindl and very happy about them

I also have enjoyed my Meindl boots. The only downside in the United States is they only seemed to be handled by Cabelas and only in two models. I usually go through a pair of boots each year, but they seem like they will wear much better. They are on the heavy side.

#47 User is offline   HOGFEVER 

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 01:21 AM

For warm weather I vote for Montrail hard rock.

#48 User is offline   DSDH 

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 07:49 AM

Well not really a hiking boot , but if you want a good pair of boot's that are comfortable and last a long time get a pair of "whites" . I bought mine in 1990 and still wear them , have had them rebuilt once ( about 150.00) , they are well worth the money spent.

#49 User is offline   FanMan 

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 03:27 PM

I posted this on the other "new to hiking" thread, but it's appropriate here:

Boots... every boot manufacturer builds their boots on a "last", which is basically a metal replica of a foot that they form the leather around. How closely the last matches your own foot determines how well the boots will fit. Once you find a bootmaker whose boots fit your feet, chances are all of their boots will fit. In my case (I have fairly narrow feet), I've found that Merrell boots fit me... I can mail order Merrell boots in my size and I know they'll fit. OTOH. I've never tried on a Vasque boot that fit... but my hiking buddy (who has wider feet than me) swears by them, and buys nothing else.

Recently I've bought most of my hiking boots from Sportsman's Guide... they're hit or miss, but they occasionally have very good deals on Merrell and other boots (and other stuff as well).

#50 User is offline   Knight2000 

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 06:48 PM

Unfortunately the tread on my boots is no longer adequate. When on slick rocks or steep trails I tend to slide a bit. I bought these boots at a thrift store or yard sale years ago. I had no idea what they were. I am sure that i paid less than $3 for them. Anyway... now that I need another pair I started to look at them. They are Irish Setter which is made/licensed by Red Wing. The boots are very comfortable and have been very durable. I like that I can be in 2 inches of water and mud and my feet stay dry.

I am thinking that it would be around $45 to resole them. On the site these boots are listed at $140. I am trying to decide what to do...

Looking at the brands mentioned no one has said anything about Red Wing. I was under the impression that for construction these were top of the line. Maybe hiking is not their style.

Any input on Red Wing, Irish Setter or Worx? I want to get my wife a good pair of hiking boots too.

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