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going barefoot? anyone else?

#1 User is offline   hippietwinkie 

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 07:45 PM

i realized today that i must look insane on a lot of the trails geocaching has brought me to because i love to walk barefoot. in fact the only times i put shoes on (mostly flip-flops) are, when i go to church and into a store that tells me i have to.

anyone else love the feeling of dirt and mud between your toes when you grab a cache in the middle of the woods?

anyone think i am crazy for walking around in the woods barefoot?

#2 User is offline   hukilaulau 

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 09:03 PM

When I moved to Long Island New York from Honolulu, I hiked and biked in open sandals until I got chiggered! Literally hundreds of bites on each foot and ankle. Several weeks of the most excruciating discomfort I've ever experienced.
Now I won't set foot on the trails without permethrin sprayed boots, socks, and long pants. I'm more skeered of chiggers than I am of ticks, bears and snakes combined! :yikes:

#3 User is offline   briansnat 

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 09:12 PM

Judging from the numerous gashes in the thick leather of my hiking boots, I'm glad I was wearing them when whatever put those cuts in them.

#4 User is offline   The_Incredibles_ 

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 10:39 PM

I don't think you're crazy. If there is no danger in doing so where you are, I say go for it.

I do enjoy going barefoot in our backyard and on the beach. However, in our forests here, there are plenty of thorns and other sharp objects to contend with-it wouldn't be safe to go barefoot.

This post has been edited by The_Incredibles_: 22 July 2012 - 10:39 PM


#5 User is offline   Don_J 

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 10:44 PM

I did a park 'n grab on the side of the road in my flip flops. Stepped three feet into the weeds and had a 1/8" diameter stick go right through the flip flop and embed itself about a 1/2" into my heel. I can't imagine hiking an actual trail in the mountains with out my hiking boots on my feet. I'm not going to tell you that you are crazy but what happens if you are barefoot in the woods and injure your foot to the point that you can't walk out?

#6 User is offline   WRASTRO 

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 10:46 PM

If it works for you go for it! I gobare foot at home and when we are at the beach. Most other places have too many sticky, pokey things that hurt.

#7 User is offline   Barefoot One & Wench 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 03:32 AM

No you are not crazy at all. I'm an avid barefooter and I have cached many times barefoot. I enjoy all the textures that the earth gives us especially the moss's that are like plush carpet. You know it's simple to avoid foot injurys just keep your eyes on the ground and watch where you tred or as it's said tred lightly. So keep em bare and free and your mind will follow :laughing: . Best, Jeff of Barefoot One & Wench

#8 User is offline   Dan2099 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 07:27 AM

I live in a pretty rural area and yeah you are probably a bit crazy for not wearing proper foot attire, my father is currently fighting a fever due to a tick bite that put him in the hospital for a few days.

#9 User is offline   cerberus1 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 08:40 AM

I guess if you're comfortable that way, good for you. Supposed to be healthier with posture and relieving stress on the knees. Probably helps to have the bullhide feet of Cody Lundin.
Me...
I'd worry too much about cuts and punctures, leading to infection. Add some poison ivy to that scrape and you're in for a treat.
Then there's bacteria and parasites (can you say hookworm?) to fret over.
In urban settings, besides glass and who-knows-what for cuts, there's also the "EEEWWW!" factor of sputum and doggy doo.

#10 User is offline   hippietwinkie 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 10:46 AM

View PostBarefoot One & Wench, on 23 July 2012 - 03:32 AM, said:

No you are not crazy at all. I'm an avid barefooter and I have cached many times barefoot. I enjoy all the textures that the earth gives us especially the moss's that are like plush carpet. You know it's simple to avoid foot injurys just keep your eyes on the ground and watch where you tred or as it's said tred lightly. So keep em bare and free and your mind will follow :laughing: . Best, Jeff of Barefoot One & Wench


glad to know someone out there understands me!

i guess it isn't for everyone. i always have a firstaid kit with me and i know that it won't protect from something like a rusty nail but it's always a good idea to look where you step!

i have also stepped on thorns and briars several times but with the way my calluses are i just pulled them out like they where stuck on a sock.

#11 User is offline   Klatch 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 11:04 AM

View Postcerberus1, on 23 July 2012 - 08:40 AM, said:

<snip>
Then there's bacteria and parasites (can you say hookworm?) to fret over.

You beat me to this point. Often overlooked by barefooters, but real.

#12 User is offline   Catydid 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 01:51 PM

My feet would never survive barefoot caching--too much gravel on the trails, too many foxtails and burs, way too much poison oak, broken glass, and miscellaneous road debris. Me and the mister cache in our five fingers. Comfy, good for you, and hold less foxtails than shoes and socks.

#13 User is offline   Harry Dolphin 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 01:54 PM

With plantar fasciitis, I have to wear orthotics most of the time.
Now! The main problem with hiking barefoot... I was hiking on MountKillingon, VT, and said: "I see a bare foot print." And everyone thought I said: "I see a bear foot print." So don't ever hike bear foot!

#14 User is offline   Lil Devil 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 02:00 PM

View PostHarry Dolphin, on 23 July 2012 - 01:54 PM, said:

With plantar fasciitis, I have to wear orthotics most of the time.

Dolphins get plantar fasciitis? Whodathunkit? :huh:

What does a dolphin's orthotic looks like? :unsure:

#15 User is offline   AZcachemeister 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 02:32 PM

You just aren't going to get away with barefoot hiking (caching or otherwise) in most of Arizona.
Can you say cactus spines?
Just an hour ago I was out in the desert in substantial shoes. I was walking carefully to avoid the cholla balls that can attach to the side of your shoe and get transferred to the opposite calf. Despite my care, I stepped on some old spines that went all the way through the shoe! :o
Add in some hot rocks, sharp gravel and stir gently with a handful of broken glass for good measure.
I'm keeping the shoes on...sandals at least!

#16 User is offline   StarBrand 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 02:38 PM

If you like it and can tolerate the bumps, nicks, cuts and bruises. Go for it.

I'm not going to.

#17 User is offline   J the Goat 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 02:45 PM

View PostHarry Dolphin, on 23 July 2012 - 01:54 PM, said:

With plantar fasciitis, I have to wear orthotics most of the time.
Now! The main problem with hiking barefoot... I was hiking on MountKillingon, VT, and said: "I see a bare foot print." And everyone thought I said: "I see a bear foot print." So don't ever hike bear foot!


There's actually a line of thought that says most foot problems are CAUSED by wearing shoes. While I'm not a barefooter, I know several. I'd probably do it if my feet weren't so soft and sensative :blink:

#18 User is offline   Harry Dolphin 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 03:20 PM

View PostJ the Goat, on 23 July 2012 - 02:45 PM, said:

View PostHarry Dolphin, on 23 July 2012 - 01:54 PM, said:

With plantar fasciitis, I have to wear orthotics most of the time.
Now! The main problem with hiking barefoot... I was hiking on MountKillingon, VT, and said: "I see a bare foot print." And everyone thought I said: "I see a bear foot print." So don't ever hike bear foot!


There's actually a line of thought that says most foot problems are CAUSED by wearing shoes. While I'm not a barefooter, I know several. I'd probably do it if my feet weren't so soft and sensative :blink:


Actually, my pawdiatrist insulted my flippers! "With flippers like those!" I have very high arches, The orthotics are having me walk on the outside of my flippers. (One of my brothers almost got thrown out of the army for ruining army boots in less than a month...)

#19 User is offline   Barefoot One & Wench 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 03:56 PM

View PostBarefoot One & Wench, on 23 July 2012 - 03:32 AM, said:

No you are not crazy at all. I'm an avid barefooter and I have cached many times barefoot. I enjoy all the textures that the earth gives us especially the moss's that are like plush carpet. You know it's simple to avoid foot injury's just keep your eyes on the ground and watch where you tred or as it's said tred lightly. So keep em bare and free and your mind will follow :laughing: . Best, Jeff of Barefoot One & Wench


ALL I CAN SAY IS TO EACH THEIR OWN. OF COURSE THERE ARE HAZARDS CACHING OR HIKING BAREFOOT AS WELL AS YOU CAN STUB YOUR TOES INSIDE YOUR HOUSE ON FURNITURE AND DO YOU WEAR STEEL TOE BOOTS IN YOUR HOME. THE SAME CARE THAT YOU TAKE IN YOUR HOUSE WHEN YOUR BAREFOOT CAN APPLY OUT IN THE WILD ON THE TRAIL OR OFF THE TRAIL. NO I WOULD NOT WALK IN THE DESSERT AMONG CACTUS NEEDLES I WOULD WALK AROUND THEM AS WELL AS AVOID A SCORPION AS I WOULD IF I WERE SHOD.SHARP ROCKS AND GRAVEL WALK AROUND THEM.IF IT GETS TO INTENSE I WOULD PUT MY CHACO HIKING SANDALS ON THAT I ALWAYS HAVE ON MY CARBINE ATTACHED TO MY PACK. ALBEIT IT SOUNDS BIZARRE EVERYTHING IN MODERATION AND WITH A HEALTHY SPOONFUL OF COMMONSENSE. YOU DOUBTERS MAY ACTUALLY LIKE THE FEELING OF MOTHER EARTH BENEATH YOUR SOLES MAYBE TRY IT SOMETIME.
I WISH YOU ALL HAPPY CACHING,

JEFF OF BAREFOOT ONE & WENCH


#20 User is offline   The_Incredibles_ 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 04:52 PM

View PostJ the Goat, on 23 July 2012 - 02:45 PM, said:

View PostHarry Dolphin, on 23 July 2012 - 01:54 PM, said:

With plantar fasciitis, I have to wear orthotics most of the time.
Now! The main problem with hiking barefoot... I was hiking on MountKillingon, VT, and said: "I see a bare foot print." And everyone thought I said: "I see a bear foot print." So don't ever hike bear foot!


There's actually a line of thought that says most foot problems are CAUSED by wearing shoes. While I'm not a barefooter, I know several. I'd probably do it if my feet weren't so soft and sensative :blink:


I would say most foot problems are caused by wearing BAD shoes.

#21 User is offline   Barefoot One & Wench 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 05:16 PM

View PostThe_Incredibles_, on 23 July 2012 - 04:52 PM, said:

View PostJ the Goat, on 23 July 2012 - 02:45 PM, said:

View PostHarry Dolphin, on 23 July 2012 - 01:54 PM, said:

With plantar fasciitis, I have to wear orthotics most of the time.
Now! The main problem with hiking barefoot... I was hiking on MountKillingon, VT, and said: "I see a bare foot print." And everyone thought I said: "I see a bear foot print." So don't ever hike bear foot!


There's actually a line of thought that says most foot problems are CAUSED by wearing shoes. While I'm not a barefooter, I know several. I'd probably do it if my feet weren't so soft and sensative :blink:


I would say most foot problems are caused by wearing BAD shoes.


I must say that all shoes are bad for the feet IMHO.Even the finest of shoes can't be lasted to match the human foots instep, match a good high arch or match the foots indicate width from heel to forefoot again IMHO.
Jeff of Barefoot One & Wench


#22 User is offline   magicalhelmet 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 05:18 PM

I strongly dislike being barefoot anywhere. The ground is full of icky disgusting things. The more separation between that and my skin, the better. Besides, it's quite painful to step on sharp pointy things, of which the out of doors has no shortage of. ^^

#23 User is offline   lamoracke 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 07:14 PM

I had a female friend whose barefoot skills made me feel slow. We'd go on a beach walk over many rocks. She would be barefoot and I would be in shoes and she would be way faster than me.

#24 User is online   Roman! 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 07:16 PM

View PostBarefoot One & Wench, on 23 July 2012 - 05:16 PM, said:

View PostThe_Incredibles_, on 23 July 2012 - 04:52 PM, said:

View PostJ the Goat, on 23 July 2012 - 02:45 PM, said:

View PostHarry Dolphin, on 23 July 2012 - 01:54 PM, said:

With plantar fasciitis, I have to wear orthotics most of the time.
Now! The main problem with hiking barefoot... I was hiking on MountKillingon, VT, and said: "I see a bare foot print." And everyone thought I said: "I see a bear foot print." So don't ever hike bear foot!


There's actually a line of thought that says most foot problems are CAUSED by wearing shoes. While I'm not a barefooter, I know several. I'd probably do it if my feet weren't so soft and sensative :blink:


I would say most foot problems are caused by wearing BAD shoes.


I must say that all shoes are bad for the feet IMHO.Even the finest of shoes can't be lasted to match the human foots instep, match a good high arch or match the foots indicate width from heel to forefoot again IMHO.
Jeff of Barefoot One & Wench



Aren't all bras bad for te back?

#25 User is offline   briansnat 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 07:52 PM

View Postmagicalhelmet, on 23 July 2012 - 05:18 PM, said:

I strongly dislike being barefoot anywhere. The ground is full of icky disgusting things. The more separation between that and my skin, the better. Besides, it's quite painful to step on sharp pointy things, of which the out of doors has no shortage of. ^^


I guess it can depend on where you live. I'm in northern New Jersey and I live right at the terminal moraine of the last glacier. Practically every rock dragged from the north country was left here when the Wisconsin glacier retreated. Hiking barefoot here is not a good idea.

30 miles south of here, it is probably less of an issue. Where the OP lives, even less so.

#26 User is offline   hippietwinkie 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 09:08 PM

I recently found a cache that was on the opposite end of a ~500 ft drainage pipe under a street. the hardest part was forcing myself to wear flip flops so i wouldn't ruin my feet on the exposed and rusty metal re-bar half way through the tunnel. the rest was just concrete and i was at an advantage because of how easily my feet could contort to the edges of the pipe.

all i have to say is, don't knock it till you try it... but then again don't try it and then come back at me :P

if any of you are even a little interested i would suggest finding a nice creek bed in the summer and starting there. after your walk down the creek bed walk along the trail on the way back to your car barefoot as well (provided there is a trail) start easy. don't walk through a desert or bush whack your first time going barefoot or you'll have a bad time.

#27 User is offline   Manville Possum Hunters 

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 10:37 PM

I went to a Rainbow Family gathering in Cherokee National Forest a few weeks ago, and I saw lot's of people that have no use for shoes or soap, and even clothing was optional. :) They don't use their real names either. :laughing:

#28 User is offline   OZ2CPU 

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 12:17 AM

I just love to watch Dual Survival with Dave Canterbury and Cody Lundin,
a few things are very clear just watch some of the episodes.
Dave thinks out loud : cody is crasy for not wearing correct protection of his feet for the job and area they walk in !!
he also often get hurt due to his barefoot attitude, and he also slow them down due to barefoot super slow walking.

I newer found one single cache where a barefoot walk could be done by me.
If others like to do it, just fine with me.
I also wear clothing so I dont get cold, while others prefer to freeze and play tarzan,
call it what you want, I call barefoot caching impractical and slow and hi risk of injurgeries,
at least for the locations I have been to.

If I was put in a position to choose from Cody or Dave
to live with in a remote location for a few days, I will for sure select Dave.
offcourse my number one favorite would be : bear grylls he is COOL !!

#29 User is offline   Barefoot One & Wench 

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 02:14 AM

View PostOZ2CPU, on 24 July 2012 - 12:17 AM, said:

I just love to watch Dual Survival with Dave Canterbury and Cody Lundin,
a few things are very clear just watch some of the episodes.
Dave thinks out loud : cody is crasy for not wearing correct protection of his feet for the job and area they walk in !!
he also often get hurt due to his barefoot attitude, and he also slow them down due to barefoot super slow walking.

I newer found one single cache where a barefoot walk could be done by me.
If others like to do it, just fine with me.
I also wear clothing so I dont get cold, while others prefer to freeze and play tarzan,
call it what you want, I call barefoot caching impractical and slow and hi risk of injurgeries,
at least for the locations I have been to.

If I was put in a position to choose from Cody or Dave
to live with in a remote location for a few days, I will for sure select Dave.
offcourse my number one favorite would be : bear grylls he is COOL !!


You are certainly intitled to your opinions. I must say when it comes to Bear Grylls IMHO the show is very staged with lots of back up support. If you want to see a real survivalist watch Survivorman with Les Stroud. I still like Cody Lunden barefeet and his attitude.


#30 User is offline   NYPaddleCacher 

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 02:23 AM

View Postbriansnat, on 23 July 2012 - 07:52 PM, said:

View Postmagicalhelmet, on 23 July 2012 - 05:18 PM, said:

I strongly dislike being barefoot anywhere. The ground is full of icky disgusting things. The more separation between that and my skin, the better. Besides, it's quite painful to step on sharp pointy things, of which the out of doors has no shortage of. ^^


I guess it can depend on where you live. I'm in northern New Jersey and I live right at the terminal moraine of the last glacier. Practically every rock dragged from the north country was left here when the Wisconsin glacier retreated. Hiking barefoot here is not a good idea.

30 miles south of here, it is probably less of an issue. Where the OP lives, even less so.


Not to mention that for about 4 month a year going barefoot would likely lead to frostbite.

#31 User is offline   xreichardx 

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 02:34 AM

I'm glad somebody brought this up. I started caching barefoot to help toughen up my feat for kungfu. Grabbed a cache yesterday on a riverwalk ala disc-golf course in a gorgeous wooded area.

Really gets you in touch with nature!

#32 User is offline   OZ2CPU 

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 03:47 AM

>Survivorman with Les Stroud.

Thanks for the hint, I check it out..

>I still like Cody Lunden

sure he is nice, and really laid-back kind of dude
I am very amazed about what kind of stuff he can eat and even look like he enjoy it :-)

you are right about the backup and support, I am sure all TV shows are made like that
they can not risk the health of a tv star.

#33 User is offline   Straight-Cache-Homey 

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 04:28 AM

I can barely go 5 feet into the bush without getting completely cut up and bruised. I couldn't imagine going barefoot. You crazy!

#34 User is offline   Trekkin' and birdin' 

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 04:49 AM

While on the trails, I'm in boots, but I do like the feeling of barefeet when I feel my old feet can take it. Water crossings are usually involved. One time I left my boots behind as we had to do several crossings and I just continued along with bare feet in the north woods (where all those rocks in New Jersey originated, but we have plenty of them left!) The trails were mostly mossy, and I do agree...it felt good. One photo with the log shows the shoeless feet.

http://coord.info/GL157769

My feet aren't tough as they were when I was young, but when I feel like being barefoot is an option, it does feel great. In the house, in the yard (in season). Distance running caused me my share of foot issues, so barefoot is a treat, not a regular thing for me now. If it works for you, I understand your enjoyment of it.

#35 User is offline   popokiiti 

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 08:52 PM

I was always barefoot at home in my teens...until I stepped on a slug in the garden. Poor slug - it felt gross! Even in the house now it can be hazardous - cats and their hairballs - gross again. I prefer my feet to be clad when out and about. Otherwise barefoot or sandals/ open slippers at home.

#36 User is offline   Andronicus 

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 07:44 AM

I did a cache bearfoot once. I was just reliesed from the hospital after minor surgery, and had to find a cache. After walking about 1/2 way to the cache, I realized my sandles were worse for my feet than none at all. So I did the rest bearfoot. A 1.9 km (little over 1 mile) on verious surfaces, packed dirt/gravel/asphalt/concreat. It was fine. I don't think I would want to do that off trail much though. Some of the places I have been, I am sure you wouldn't have feet left if you didn't have boots on.

Edit: Forgot to mention that I did most of the 1.9km running as my wife was expecting me home.
Log: http://www.geocachin...ab-8bc3adbbaccc

This post has been edited by Andronicus: 26 July 2012 - 07:55 AM


#37 User is offline   mymren 

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 07:56 AM

View PostHarry Dolphin, on 23 July 2012 - 01:54 PM, said:

With plantar fasciitis, I have to wear orthotics most of the time.


I've had it twice before, quite painful indeed. I have a fabulous massage therapist who worked on it for about 30-45 minutes - very painful - and it was sore for a couple more days, but it was gone for 3 years before it came back and I had him work on it again. That has been about 2 years ago this time. I have high arches and try to always make sure my shoes have support.

#38 User is offline   Don_J 

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 09:09 AM

I did a hike the other day and the ticks were increadable. Big, fat juicy ones. I had to continually beat them out of the grass alongside the trail just so I could pass. I'm not kidding, literally thousands of them running all over the place, and climbing up my boots. I guess if one likes the texture of live ticks between their toes, go for it. I'm keeping my boots on.

I kind of look at like owning a purely electric car. Going barefoot limits the places you can go. Just like I can't get an electric car from LA to Vegas, you probably are not going to walk over a half mile of sharp volcanic rock to get to LA County's oldest cache in your bare feet

#39 User is offline   Rainbow Spirit 

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 07:27 PM

Believe it or not our ancient ancestors didn't have designer sports shoes when they chased down their evening meal...They relied on years of toughening up to get their soles as thick as possible.

When I went bare foot years ago whilst farming, the soles of my feet had calloused skin about a 1/4 inch thick, and I could walk across rocks and stones with impunity. Broken glass though......I still have the scar from that day!

#40 User is offline   knowschad 

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 07:38 PM

View Postmymren, on 26 July 2012 - 07:56 AM, said:

View PostHarry Dolphin, on 23 July 2012 - 01:54 PM, said:

With plantar fasciitis, I have to wear orthotics most of the time.


I've had it twice before, quite painful indeed. I have a fabulous massage therapist who worked on it for about 30-45 minutes - very painful - and it was sore for a couple more days, but it was gone for 3 years before it came back and I had him work on it again. That has been about 2 years ago this time. I have high arches and try to always make sure my shoes have support.


The barefoot enthusiasts would tell you that you're doing it wrong. Their belief is that the support that your shoes or orthotics are giving you are merely crutches that will make the already week arch muscles that much weaker. They push exercises and barefoot running as the solution. I'm not saying who's right and who's wrong, but there is a lot of empirical evidence that they just may have a point.

I will say that I've never heard of massage therapy for PF, but I have heard of using a tennis ball for self-massage.

#41 User is online   Roman! 

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 08:34 PM

View PostRainbow Spirit, on 26 July 2012 - 07:27 PM, said:

Believe it or not our ancient ancestors didn't have designer sports shoes when they chased down their evening meal...They relied on years of toughening up to get their soles as thick as possible.

When I went bare foot years ago whilst farming, the soles of my feet had calloused skin about a 1/4 inch thick, and I could walk across rocks and stones with impunity. Broken glass though......I still have the scar from that day!


I'm so glad we evolved, at least most of us did ;)

Heck I won't even go barefoot on a beach anymore, glass, needles other pointy things, they're everywhere, maybe 10,000 years ago I'd try it.

#42 User is offline   Don_J 

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 08:59 PM

View PostRainbow Spirit, on 26 July 2012 - 07:27 PM, said:

Believe it or not our ancient ancestors didn't have designer sports shoes when they chased down their evening meal...They relied on years of toughening up to get their soles as thick as possible.

When I went bare foot years ago whilst farming, the soles of my feet had calloused skin about a 1/4 inch thick, and I could walk across rocks and stones with impunity. Broken glass though......I still have the scar from that day!


Yeah, but as soon as they started eating that meat, the protein made their brains smarter and they realized that they could wrap the animal's hide around their feet, thus making them more efficient hunters.

I am much more efficient hunting caches if I don't have to worry about impaling my foot on a stick.

#43 User is offline   DannyCaffeine 

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 02:39 AM

I like being barefoot but there are just too many hazards.

#44 User is offline   DonB 

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 04:37 AM

If I did that while caching I'd be a cripple by now.

#45 User is offline   bflentje 

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 09:20 AM

A couple weeks back I was geocaching in the UT/ID/WY desert (ok, open range) wearing flipflops. Have to be extra careful watching out for yuccas, prickly pears, and snakes.

#46 User is offline   Shiraz-mataz 

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 02:42 AM

Sorry I noticed this thread so late! To the O.P., I am an avid barefooter and have completed nearly half of my cache finds without shoes. This includes urban outings, to grassy parks, to rocky crags in the mountains. The key, as others have pointed out, is to keep your eyes open and watch where you step. The "true" hazards of barefooting are few and overblown - in all my time barefooting I have never suffered a puncture wound or gash. If you peruse my photo gallery you'll come across a shot or two of me barefoot. All I can say is, everyone should hike their own hike, be careful in whatever you do, and don't dismiss anything that at first seems too offbeat or difficult.

#47 User is offline   knowschad 

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 12:11 PM

REI has an excellent article on so-called "barefoot" running (which may or may not use minimalist "barefoot" running shoes: http://www.rei.com/l...st-running.html

#48 User is offline   ll JK ll 

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 01:17 PM

I think it would be cool but I'm sticking with shoes/boots. I'm sure my feet could handle it, they're pretty calloused from years of playing outside barefoot as a kid and also walking to the mailbox barefoot along gravel/paved driveways.

I'm sticking with shoes because I've seen so much broken glass along trails, especially primitive trails with plenty of leaf cover that I would be too anxious of puncturing my feet. I understand that keeping a watchful eye is the easy way to avoid hazards but my hikes would be slowed down tremendously.

Maybe if I see a nice patch of moss I'll remove my shoes and get a feel for nature's carpet ;)

#49 User is offline   Andronicus 

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 02:38 PM

View Postll JK ll, on 20 August 2012 - 01:17 PM, said:

I think it would be cool but I'm sticking with shoes/boots. I'm sure my feet could handle it, they're pretty calloused from years of playing outside barefoot as a kid and also walking to the mailbox barefoot along gravel/paved driveways.

I'm sticking with shoes because I've seen so much broken glass along trails, especially primitive trails with plenty of leaf cover that I would be too anxious of puncturing my feet. I understand that keeping a watchful eye is the easy way to avoid hazards but my hikes would be slowed down tremendously.

Maybe if I see a nice patch of moss I'll remove my shoes and get a feel for nature's carpet ;)

The problem with keeping a watchful eye is that you can miss some of the other natural beauty that you are walking through. Also, I have found that asphalt pathes are fairly good because it is quite easy to see what you are going to step on.

#50 User is offline   Ma & Pa 

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 04:32 PM

Have you heard of the Barefoot Sisters?

http://www.barefooth...ot-sisters.html


Over 1000 miles in each direction, hiking the Appalachian Trail takes one over mountains, through valleys, past towns, and through untouched wilderness. The hike takes months and weather conditions can vary from snow to sweletering summer heat along the course. Not only did Isis and Jackrabbit make this incredible trek, but, unlike most of there fellow AT hikers, Isis and Jackrabbit did most of it free of footwear--that's right--BAREFOOT! This somewhat unheard of choice of gear has gotten the sisters much attention during their hike, from others hikers and the press. Most people can't imagine the feet being able to handle such a journey unprotected. Of course, we can!

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